DIY Mobile & Modular Workbench To Bring Your Shop to the Next Level

I tirelessly searched YouTube and Pinterest for workbench designs, and after taking into account the tools I have and the types of project I work on, there were essentially three main features I needed:

  1. Mobility – Hauling tools in and out of a garage is tiring and it eats up time during a build. Plus, if you’re like me, your garage is not quite a full-time woodshop, so being able to store a workbench to the side is a must.
  2. Size – I needed a workbench that could accommodate the largest material I might find myself working with: a 4’x8′ sheet of plywood. It takes a large workbench to act as a decent out-feed table for a table saw or to provide an adequate work area when assembling larger projects.
  3. Modular – A good workbench should be able to change with your needs, so I designed this workbench to either be two smaller halves or one big work area. I also built-in a slot to accommodate a variety of fixed tools such as a miter saw, pocket hole jig, router table, etc.

To see how it all came together, check out the build video below. If you think this design might work for you, jump below the fold to see step-by-step instructions.

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Build Your Own Lumber Rack “Mullet Style”

My workshop will always need to be a garage first and woodworking shop second. To help with my lumber storage, I decided to build my own lumber rack. I searched Pinterest for ideas, but I couldn’t quite find a design that mounted to a wall while still being able to storage large sheets of plywood and long boards simultaneously.

I decided to make my own design where sheets of plywood would be stored in a large framed shelf, while sporting the traditional arm shelves for storing long boards. I also added some small cubbies for storing small cut-offs and specialty pieces of lumber. In a phrase, this lumber rack is all about boards in the front and big sheet goods in the back – head the name “Mullet-style” lumber rack. While you mull the name over, check out the build video below.

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DIY Racetrack Farmhouse Table: Easily Make Large Circular Cuts.

DIY Racetrack Farm Table with Trestle Base

After building a banquette in my kitchen’s nook, I needed to a table to go with it. Because of the angular shape of the banquette, I needed a table that would allow people to easily scoot around it, and that’s where the racetrack shape works perfectly. The tricky part of building a racetrack table is making large circular cuts. For woodworking novices like myself, this might seem daunting, but with a circular saw and a simple jig made of plywood, it can be done. Here’s how…

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Cheers! Create Your Personal Wall-Mount Bottle Opener

Workshops have their essentials: work bench, table saw, power drill, but there’s one tool I’ve been wanting to add for some time: a wall-mounted bottle opener. Sure, I could just use the opener in the kitchen drawer, but there’s just something satisfying about cracking open a cold one with one hand. With a little work, hardware off of Amazon, and some tricks I’ve learned along the way, here’s how you can make your own wall-mount bottle opener.

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How to Print on Wood (Sort of)

You might not know this, but the inkjet printer sitting around your house still has a few tricks up its paper tray. It can print on wood – well, sort of.

In planning for my daughter’s first birthday party, I attempted to track down a vintage sign related doughnuts (it was a doughnut-themed party). Rather than spend a bunch of money on Etsy, I thought, “Why not just make this sign myself?” The only problem was that trying to paint anything by hand would look not so great, so I took to Google to find a way to transfer a digital design from my computer to a piece of wood. It turns out that trusty wax paper sitting in your kitchen drawer makes this all possible. Let’s get to it.

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Oxidize! Getting A Vintage Wood Look

When it comes to home decor, vintage is definitely in. But if you have ever done some DIY woodworking projects, you’ll know it can be hard to obtain that aged wood look. You can either buy pricey “barn wood” from a boutique lumber supplier or let your new lumber from Home Depot sit in the backyard, exposed to the elements for a couple of midwest winters – or perhaps you may want to use this easy, inexpensive method for aging your wood in just under a week.

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